Nutrition Tips for Flying

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Nutrition Tips for Flying

Nutrition Tips for Flying

It can be hard to eat healthfully while traveling. Airports are filled with opportunities to consume junk food, and sticking to your normal eating habits tends to be difficult when you’re on the move. Some foods and drinks are better or worse than others, however. To keep your body happy when you fly, keep the following food tips in mind.

– Stay away from greasy fast food joints. A “value meal” from a burger joint is hard for your body to digest even under ideal circumstances, and your digestion doesn’t work ideally when you’re on a plane. Salty, processed foods like those at fast food joints can lead to bloating and discomfort that will make a plane ride much less enjoyable.

– Avoid drinking caffeinated drinks, carbonated beverages, and alcohol. Each of these drink options carries pitfalls for travelers. Drinking alcohol and caffeine can complicate the dehydration problems inherent in flying and disturb your sleep schedule. Carbonated beverages can also lead to discomfort because of cramping and bloating.

– Bring light, healthy snacks. Rather than eating one large meal, try snacking intermittently on treats like dried fruit or popcorn chips.

– Stay hydrated. Drinking water or juice will help combat the dehydration caused by flying.

– If you’re in a hurry, grab a sandwich. Among the many airport food options, sandwiches often give you the best nutrition. Choose a sandwich with whole-wheat bread and lean protein like chicken or turkey to get the most out of your meal.

– Avoid foods that cause bloating. Broccoli, cabbage, onions, and peaches can all lead to bloating, even though they’re healthy foods. You’re better off avoiding them prior to flying.

– If you need to adjust to a new time zone, try fasting. Avoiding food for a long period, like 16 to 18 hours, before your flight, then resuming eating on a schedule synched with your new time zone can help your body adjust. The body’s sleep cycle relies in part on its eating schedule.

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